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Washing your wrap

Washing your wrap

Proper care will ensure that your wrap has a long life. How to treat your wrap is determined by the fibers of which it is woven. When determining how to wash a wrap of blended fibers (for example a mix of cotton and wool) always treat the wrap accordig to the most delicate fiber. 

LOOMSTATE WASH

Most of our wraps are shipped in loomstate, and require an initial wash to set the fibres before use. Follow these guidelines to safely wash your wrap.

COTTON

WASHING

Cotton is a very sturdy easy-care fibre, and can be machine washed. It will tolerate up to 60 degrees celcius. Detergents with enzymes is recommended, as this will enable you wash it perfectly clean at lower temperatures. 30 celcius is often enough. Washing on lower temperatures will minimize wear on your wrap.

DRYING

We do not recommend tumble drying your cotton wrap, as it might shrink, but your cotton wrap will not be ruined if you decide to do it. If tumble drying, we recommend cold air.

IRONING

Cotton can be ironed on a medium-high setting. Use steam.

 

LINEN

WASHING

Like cotton, linen is an easy-care fibre, meaning it can be machine washed with detergents with enzymes. We recommend you do not wash your linen wrap on more than 30 degrees to keep the shine of the linen intact.

DRYING

Linen should not be tumble dryed if you wish to keep the shine intact. Instead, let it air dry, smoothing the fabric by hand and then give it a good ironing (medium-high) when it is still a bit moist. 

IRONING

Ironing wraps containing linen is recommended, as linen tends to crease in the same spot which can cause the threads to slide apart and with time create weaknesses in the fabric. This tendency is alleviated by occationally washing and ironing your wrap.

 

WOOL

Wool, like merino, is a wonderful and sturdy fibre, but can felt if treated incorrectly. Felting is when the surface of the wool fibres fluff up and grip into each other, somwhat like velcro. A felted wrap will shrink a lot as the fibers contract, and the fabric will become "squaky" and less flexible. A felted wrap should not be used for carrying. Felting of wool is caused by a combination of three factors: moisture, rapid temperature changes and agitation. 

To avoid this combination, we advice against maching washing wraps containing wool. 

When it comes to washing wool, less is more. Woolen wraps can be refreshed by airing, or hanging in the bathroom while you shower to suck up the air moisture.

WASHING

Woolen wraps should be hand-washed in lukewarm water (max 30 celcius) using liquid detergent especially made for wool. I use a (large) baby bathtub. Fill the tub with hand warm water, add the detergent, stir to distribute, and then soak the wrap completely in the water, make sure it's thoroughly wet and use very little friction. Wetness, temperature chock and friction is what causes felting. Mostly just let it sit there. Swish gently if you must.
When the wrap has soaked for a while, lift it out, supporting the weight evenly. Empty the tub, and refill with clean water, same temperature. Soak again and swish gently to remove soap.

DRYING

Gently pres excess water out - don't wring! Lay the wrap out on (or or more) bath towel(s), folding it if necessary. Then roll it up in the towel(s). Next, step on the roll to press the water into the towels. Unroll, and lay the wrap flat to dry on fresh towels or spread out on a dryer rack. It is important that the weight is spread out evenly to avoid deforming.
Never tumble dry a wrap containing wool -  it will felt even on cold setting.

IRONING

Wool can be ironed on low setting, always with steam. The wrap must be dry before ironing.

SILK

WASHING

Like wool, silk is a protein-based fibre meaning that it will break down if washed with detergent containing enzymes. Silk can be machine washed on max. 30 degrees on a delicate setting, as there is no danger of felting. Some silk can have a distinct smell when wet, this is due to naturally occuring "glue" from the silk moth's cocoon still being present on the fibre. The smell will be far less noticable when he wrap dries again. Uneven silks like bouratte and tussah are more prone to this.

DRYING

When drying a silk wrap, follow the guidelines for drying wool, adding that silk must always dry in shade and never in direct sunlight.

IRONING

Silk can be ironed on lowest temperature. Use steam.

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